June–Deliberating on Egypt, Mexico & Israel

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June was my first full month of summer break–a delightful 30 days of waking up with no alarm, of running errands in the middle of the day, of thinking of nothing but what I wanted to watch on Netflix. Sure, I am also in the last month of planning my wedding, which kept me fairly busy but mostly with tasks that were fun to me. But mostly, June was deliciously relaxing, an unprecedented time of basically uninterrupted self care.

I spent the month reading books about remarkably strong women in the most challenging of circumstances–a little ironic, since my life resembled that of a 50’s housewife (lots of cleaning before my fiancé came home from work, shopping, cooking, and basically eating bonbons on the couch).

Nonfiction typically takes much more of my focus, rendering me hell-bent to take note of all the facts, so it made sense to kick off my new open schedule with Cleopatra. Reading about the queen of luxury while luxuriating myself–well, it was divine. Sure, the girl had her fair share of challenges: a murderous family, a few scandalous baby-daddies, and a tumultuous political climate to rule, but she was also one of the richest people to walk this earth, and practically invented decadence. I may not have spent my first days of summer hosting feasts for dignitaries or cruising the Nile in a bejeweled barge, but I did engage in my own version, which typically entailed multiple cups of midday coffee, binge-watching my favorite shows on Netflix, and putting the final details on lovely wedding crafts.

Next, I was excited for a quick read–something that would encourage me to take time from running errands and watching TV–and that’s exactly what I got with Like Water for Chocolate. I loved the protagonist, strong, passionate Tita who endures multiple heartbreaks with bravery and wisdom. It was a colorful and atypical love story, and I devoured it in three days.

Lastly, I capped off the month with The Red Tent, a book that has been on my TBR list for months but kept getting pushed to back-burner as my reading pace slowed. Biblical fiction isn’t what I would say is one of my go-to genres, but I could certainly understand why this novel has garnered so much acclaim. Dinah’s journey into womanhood was compelling and her forays into heartbreak were completing spellbinding.

While I do feel sad the summer is halfway over, I am excited to be onto my next step as a woman: marriage. I’m thankful to have spent my last month as a single girl with a cast of bold and independent females!

May–Inspecting Kiribati, Burundi & Scotland

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May! May is the last month of school, my birthday month–it is a time for celebrating! And while it is exciting, it is also a hectic time.

No matter how much I try to prepare, the chaos of wrapping of a school year is hard for me to avoid. Finalizing grades, attending end-of-year celebrations, preparing for the next year, and trying to suppress my excitement for summer–well, these things kick my butt. Therefore, my reading habits were erratic–either nonexistent or completed in hermit-like binging.

I started The Sex Lives with Cannibals thinking it would be a quick, funny read (I had actually hoped to finish it in April, which leads me to my next point). I was exactly 50% right on my prediction. J. Maarten Troost’s travel tales were bizarre and hilarious; however, this was a slower read for me. Partially because, due to the title, I couldn’t read this book at school while my students were reading, but partially because it is nonfiction, and even though it’s a quirky memoir, it’s filled with important information and history, which always takes me a little longer to digest. Nevertheless, Maarten Troost’s sardonic reverence for the impossible to understand set the perfect tone on which to close out the school year. My students and administration are constantly baffling, my patience and energy fluctuate unpredictably (actually, not unpredictably–usually in proportion to the amount of coffee on hand), and it frequently strikes me as a strange situation that I graduated college and now one of my responsibilities is telling children multiple times a day that they are not allowed to use the restroom. Maarten’s ability to take into stride an island that eats wild dogs and defecates along the beach struck a chord of camaraderie with me. It also made me excited for my next adventure (marriage of course, and a honeymoon in a new city!).

To find something acceptable to read in my classroom during our book report unit, I started Strength in What Remains. This time, I unknowingly picked up my second nonfiction book–though admittedly, this intimate narrative flows much like a fictional story. Our book report unit focused on characters who understand themselves better through some unusual challenge (students read The House on Mango Street, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, or Speak), and this book unintentionally fit right into that team as Deo immigrated to the U.S. and persevered through a variety of issues as he adapted to his new home and coped with the civil war he left behind. Interesting, and occasionally challenging to read (but then again, that may be because I chose to read it largely in the presence of 25 teenagers), despite the fact that I was reading a few minutes each day with my students, this book took most of May to get through as I delved into grading and preparing for 8th grade promotion.

I squeezed in The Illuminations towards the end of the year, a book I’ve been looking forward to reading, a treat for completing my end-of-year to-do list. Though my brain was ready to relax and sit down with a few hundred pages of literature, apparently life wasn’t ready to allow that. My first few days of freedom found me celebrating my ass off–hitting the bars and even crashing my fiancé’s bachelor party–and little time/brain power to sit back with this tale of an elderly woman’s journey to recall the beautiful details of her past.

And while I thought I’d finish the month with some much-anticipated book time, my last few days of May were spent Netflix-binging and finally taking care of some of the wedding tasks that got pushed to the back burner during the school year. Which also explains why my monthly recap is 9 days late (especially if you toss in my bachelorette party and a handful of end-of-fire-academy celebrations!). But hey, it’s summer–and I’m going to be a wife in less than two months!

Scotland with The Illuminations

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“Out there, staring into the mountains, it occurred to him that he had travelled far from his old resources, from Anne Quirk and her mysterious belief that truth and silence can conquer everything. Was she even real in herself, he asked. Or was she just another of life’s compelling hopes?”–Andrew O’Hagan, The Illuminations

  • Here’s what happens:
    • An introspective and artsy tale about aging photographer Anne Quirk and her soldier grandson Luke, this novel tackles the topics of family, memory, purpose, and perspective.
  • It’s good because:
    • Pretty, unique, and important, O’Hagan carefully crafts a story that is detailed and relatable in its beautifully connected internal and external conflicts.
  • Read if:
    • You want to revel in the challenges one discovers on memory lane–the details that slip away and the ones that haunt us. Anne and Luke’s trouble forgetting and recalling various parts of their lives will bring you to wonder what aspects of your own life will stick with you, whether you want it to or not.

Up next: Egypt with Cleopatra: A Life by Stacy Schiff!

April–Studying Sweden

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There is a specific kind of short-tempered exhaustion that hits teachers in the last month of school. Combine that with the frustration of forcing teenagers to complete 5 days of silent state testing, coming home to a grumpy and sunburned firefighter, and mitigating the wedding requests of an involved family and over 200 guests–well, at that wiped out intersection is where you’ll find me, face-down and begging for coffee.

Being a total idiot, I also spent April signing up for extra duties like Saturday School, house-sitting for my parents, and taking charge of organizing a volunteer activity for the Teach for America board I serve on.

I’ve kicked my own butt this month.

Nevertheless, it’s spring–my favorite time of year, my birthday is coming up, and we are officially in the double digits of our nuptial countdown, so I’ve done my best to squeeze in some fun as well. My in-laws, my fiancé and I did Pat’s Run together, I roped in some friends to attend our Cajun Festival so I could suck down some crawfish, and we celebrated both of my parents’ birthdays. We closed out the month with my bridal shower, which was basically a giant tailgate thrown in my honor–exactly what I wanted.

So with all that going on, it wasn’t terribly surprising that I spent almost the whole month with one book, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Albeit, it was a longer one and I was certainly out of my element genre-wise.

I finished The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo while my students were state testing, and I actually got a bulk of the reading done at school. I had no idea violence against women played such a central role to the plot, so my inner activist was pleased to have read this book during Sexual Assault Awareness Month. It took me a while to get into the political, financial world set up by Larsson, but once the mystery of the Vanger family began to unfold, I plowed through the final 300 pages quite quickly. I don’t know if I identified with mild-mannered and investigative Blomkvist or analytical and angry Salander, but I appreciate both of this off-beat characters and enjoyed them as a team.

I had every intention of making it to Kiribati this month–especially since I took a personal day to spend at home–but alas, it did not happen. The last weekend of April was spent celebrating at my bridal shower, attending my niece and nephew’s third birthday part, and recovering from those two momentous occasions (thank you notes, clean-up, and maybe a smidgen of a hangover..). Therefore, the time I thought I’d have for reading never presented itself.

Less than a month left of school (though that month does include an overnight field trip to Los Angeles with 24 8th-graders). Less than three months until I’m a married woman. Looking forward to a few good books to accompany me during this exciting time!

Sweden with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

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“Armageddon was yesterday. Today we have a serious problem.”–Stieg Larsson, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

  • Here’s what happens:
    • Though most of you have probably already read this book and/or seen the movie, this is the story of a besmirched journalist and an offbeat investigator navigating a world of political and social intrigue. Tasked with deciphering the mysterious disappearance of a businessman’s niece, writer Blomkvist takes us on a jarring journey into the violent underbelly of a family corporation and their fanatical beliefs.
  • It’s good because:
    • This book was obviously a big deal. It was a best seller, it merited two sequels, and the movie adaptation was also widely acclaimed. This was a book that everyone has read. So, I obviously am not saying anything particularly new in professing that it is well-crafted with a meticulous plot and off-beat, well-rounded characters. Not my go-to genre to be sure, but definitely an excellent novel.
  • Read if:
    • You’re one of the few weirdos (like me) who hasn’t read it yet. Gritty and complex, it’s clear why this series took off the way it did.

Up next: Kiribati with The Sex Lives of Cannibals by J. Maarten Troost.

March–Sifting through Burma, Croatia & Sri Lanka

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My reading journey in March kicked off in Spring Break, about 10 days into the month. Unlike my teacher self of two years ago, I had zero exciting plans for break. No vacations. No schedules. Nada. Just a list of chores I’d like to accomplish, and several days of alone time to recharge.

So I set about getting my house in order, cooking for a firefighter now in 10-hour days of training, completing my taxes, paying deposits for various wedding services–and buckling down on becoming an active reader.

I finally focused on finishing Jan Phillip-Sendker’s The Art of Hearing Heartbeats, a book I dragged through for really no reason at all. The story was quick-paced, emotional, and full of riveting and moving plot twists. It was the kind of literary adventure I’m typically drawn to, a venture into the unknown that leads the characters to examine themselves. As I mentioned last month, I’ll blame my pace on the chaos of my life and not the quality of the novel; it was a beautiful love story that made me thankful for the love in my life.

I picked up Girl at War by Sara Novic unexpectedly at the Tucson Book Festival, and decided to throw it into my reading itinerary. I visited Croatia last summer, so this was a fascinating glimpse of their history–a history that more or less transpired in my lifetime. Ana is a resilient and strong narrator whose restraint and perseverance were inspiring. Hers is a story of how an everyday existence can crumble into a lifetime wracked by genocide and war. She is the strong and honest heroine I love, which is perhaps part of the reason why I did not enjoy my next book quite as much.

Wreck and Order‘s Elsie struck me as hapless, confused, and honestly a little lazy. While her plight of not understanding her life’s purpose was certainly a relevant and important one, the self-destructive and half-assed ways she went about it were hard to rationalize. And maybe that was part of the point, I’m not entirely sure. Maybe Elsie is who all struggling twenty-somethings are at their core, whether we like it or not.

While I keep hoping to get my reading stride back, it’s becoming increasingly apparent that until the wedding is over, it is going to be very difficult. Breaks and lulls in school certainly help, but free time is typically spent preparing for the wedding in some fashion–working out, managing guest list, visiting the town we’re getting married in, planning or honeymoon–and that’s okay. We only get to do this once, and while I’m so excited it’s just over three months away, I should just enjoy the process rather than worrying about the lack of balance in my life these days.

Nevertheless, it is nice to encounter a book I love that sticks with me all month, such as Girl at War, to help me remember why it’s always good to make time for reading.

Here’s to a month that’ll include state testing at my school, the second month of my fiancé’s firefighting academy, my bridal shower, Easter, my parents’ birthdays, Saturday school, and a hopefully a book or two.

Croatia with Girl at War

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“Though I hadn’t told the professor anything about myself, he seemed to know I was not at home in the world, and so he lent me books–Kundera and Conrad and Levi and a host of other displaced person.”–Ana Juric, Girl at War

  • Here’s what happens:
    • This is a fresh, raw account of a war our side of the globe paid little attention to, as Ana sharply points out. The story starts out with how the Yugoslavian Civil War shaped a young Croatian girl’s life, and transforms into a brilliant coming of age story as she comes to terms with who she is, where’s she from, and what’s happened to her.
  • It’s good because:
    • Novic’s writing is concise and important, imparting the severity of this tale with heartbreaking and sparse details. This story is set apart from many accounts of young girls caught in the midst of war because it doesn’t end when the tanks roll out of her homeland. This is as much a story of reconciliation and recovery, and the bulk of the novel is Ana coping with her experience as a survivor and making amends with the country she fled.
  • Read if:
    • The Amazon synopsis of this book says it will delight fans of All the Light We Cannot See, and while I can certainly see similarities between the two, this book reminded me more of Between Shades of Gray. It may be because both stories are set in the Baltic region, but it’s also because both are narrated by strong, young women who tell the story with naiveté and perseverance. I hadn’t read a book I’d torn through in two days in a very long time–both due to how busy I’ve been, but also because I hadn’t loved any of my recent reads–but this book was powerful and vivid and kept me spellbound.

Up next: Sri Lank with Wreck and Order by Hannah Tennant-Moore!